Postcards From // Manchester

Let’s talk about crossing streets in the UK. How do you do it? Which direction do you look? Cars seemingly jump from any direction and I just do not understand. Looking and seeing a passing car not having a driver in the correct front seat is terrifying. My brain doesn’t register that I’m in England and drivers sit on the left side of the car and instead jumps immediately to robot driving cars. I’m not sure why robot powered cars are so scary to me because it’s 2018 and those exist. Anyway, send me good thoughts so I don’t accidentally bump into a car while crossing the street––or rather a car doesn’t accidentally bump into me.

I feel like I didn’t do a ton of touristy things while I was in Manchester. I just did a lot of walking and ‘window tourism.’ I’m not sure if window tourism is a thing, but I basically I walked around the city and looked at things without going inside––sort of the same thing as window shopping but with architecture. Maybe this is just regular tourism, but I like the ever flashy window tourism term better.

I saw the Manchester Cathedral, the canals, the shopping districts, Town Hall, some of the train stations, as well as Chinatown. The canals were my favorite part of the city. Pedestrian foot bridges criss cross the waterways and larger train bridges sit further above the water. Lots of geese live on the canals, and several houseboats were scattered throughout the waterways as well. Trust me, it was as picturesque as it sounds. Independent galleries, restaurants, and bars are intermixed in the canals as well. I’d consider living in one of the houseboats if I knew how to swim.

One of the few places that I went to in Manchester was the Manchester Art Gallery. Most of the art that they had on display was from the eighteenth and nineteenth century, which are the periods of which my main interests lie. I think most, if not all, of the collection was by British artists. I feel like in art history courses we mostly brush over British artists––except Turner, Hockney, and Hirst––and I’m really loving getting introduced to new British artists! For example, I fell in love with Henry Moore’s Mount’s Bay. The Art Gallery placed two mustard yellow chairs in front of the painting, which is allows the viewers (aka, me) to sit and look at the choppy waves. The chairs make the museum seem much more home–y and sort of make it seem like you’re watching the ocean out the window of your beach house. Another cool artist that I saw was Kate Haywood, but they only had a few of her works on display so I gotta do some more research before I declare her a new fav artist.

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